Dating site spam emails

A recently released list, by a fraud-busting company called Scamalytics, of the top lines and photos used in profiles by online dating grifters shows that while the range of sophistication may vary, the end goal is always the same: To fleece romance-seekers out of their money.

The pick-up line "I am not interested in games or drama" cracks the top 20, which sounds legitimate enough, but so does "having past events shape your life is one thing carrying the past as a burden that sits heavily upon your shoulders is not the way i view life."There are millions of scam online dating accounts created each month, says Scamalytics co-founder Dan Winchester.

To make matters worse, you could end up getting an invitation to see someone’s photos that they shared. In doing so, you end up agreeing to their terms and conditions.

Once you do, they CAN go through your full contact list from the email address you provided during the sign up and spam everyone in your contact list with an invitation that looks like it was from you.

In my case, there's no evidence of a breach and Google likely has bigger fish to fry -- I can't expect the team to launch a forensic investigation to track down my low-volume tormenter.

My best option, Google's help files suggest, is to mark offending emails as spam and shuttle them to a separate folder.

On the one hand, typos happen and it's possible for one or two errant emails to slip through. Google's Gmail site for suspicious messages doesn't address my specific issue, but there is a nine-point security checklist that mostly covers the basics.

On the other hand, why this concentration; why the pattern of new account signups? this is the work of something (or someone) most foul. You know, create a strong password, check for suspicious messages (yep, I see them!

Music.ly, a service I've never heard of, also appeared, as well as "Allison's" brand-new State Farm Insurance account just a few days after that. Some emails provide the option to disassociate myself from some of these accounts by clicking within the message, but I'm wary of interacting with a potentially fraudulent email trying to pry out my sensitive information. It's a borderline case of suspicious behavior to be sure.

“We then take the learnings from that academic exercise, and try to scale them up into a production environment that works at enormous speed.”Some of those indicators are proprietary, but a few are fairly obvious.

Fake photos are usually a giveaway; when in doubt, do a reverse Google image search.

"The rule is that if you didn't ask for it, don't click on it and don't open it." More bad news?

Hunting down a lone 'bot is impractical and expensive, which leaves the burden of dealing with it on the people who are affected most.

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